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Save the date for the launch of State of the Nation 2016: Who is in Charge? Mandates, Accountability and Contestations in South Africa

Invitation to the launch of State of the Nation 2016

 

State of the Nation 2016: Who is in Charge? Mandates, Accountability and Contestations in South AfricaHSRC Press is proud to invite you to the launch of its flagship title release, State of the Nation 2016: Who is in Charge? Mandates, Accountability and Contestations in South Africa.

The publication is edited by Daniel Plaatjies, Charles Hongoro, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Muxe Nkondo and Francis Nyamnjoh.

The event will be held on 14 June in Cape Town.

Kindly save the date.

Event Details

  • Date: Tuesday, 14 June 2016
  • Time: TBC
  • Venue: TBC, Cape Town

Book Details

  • State of the Nation 2016: Who is in Charge? Mandates, Accountability and Contestations in South Africa edited by Daniel Plaatjies, Charles Hongoro, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Muxe Nkondo and Francis Nyamnjoh
    EAN: 9780796925138
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

Shaun Ruggunan examines the globalisation and the shipping industry in Waves of Change

Waves of ChangeNew from HSRC Press, Waves of Change: Globalisation and Seafaring Labour Markets by Shaun Ruggunan:

Over 90 percent of the goods we use – from our smartphones to the fuel in our cars – are transported by ships. The cargo shipping industry is the most globalised industry in the world, yet we know very little about the context in which these ships operate or the ways in which seafaring labour is organised.

Drawing on evidence from South Africa and the Philippines, Waves of Change provides an account of globalisation, seafaring labour markets and the state that allows us to understand how processes of globalisation unfold in this industry.

Scholars, policymakers, students and those with a general interest in globalisation and labour will find Waves of Change a revelatory account of an industry about which little is generally known.

Waves of Change highlights the complex, often poorly understood world of the global shipping industry and the seafarers who carry more than 90 percent of the world’s trade by volume.

As one of the oldest global industries, the book challenges the simplistic capitalistic and neoclassical ideals that subsequently argue for nation states to leave the commercial fate of any domestic shipping industry to global market forces. Instead the author asks many critical questions.

Most profound being if nations rely on shipping so heavily and global markets are so turbulent and equilibrium so elusive, why have so many governments abandoned shipping industry reform?

- Dr Marcus Bowles, Director of the Institute for Working Futures and Professor at the Australian Maritime College, University of Tasmania

Book details

The struggle in South Africa is the most important battle of the century for Black people – Assata Shakur

AssataAssata Shakur is a founding member of the Black Liberation Army, a former Black Panther, the godmother of Tupac Shakur, and the first ever woman to make the FBI’s most wanted terrorist list.

In 2013, Shakur was tried and convicted for the murder of a white state trooper in 1973. Her case became emblematic of race relations and police brutality.

Some label her a ruthless killer, others cite her as the victim of a systematic campaign to suppress black nationalist organisations.

Shakur’s biography, Assata: The FBI’s most wanted woman, was first published in 1987, and released in a new edition last year, with a South African introduction by William Gumede.

Read an excerpt:

Freedom. I couldn’t believe that it had really happened, that the nightmare was over, that finally the dream had come true. I was elated. Ecstatic. But i was completely disoriented. Everything was the same, yet everything was different. All of my reactions were super-intense. I submerged myself in patterns and textures, sucking in smells and sounds as if each day was my last. I felt like a voyeur. I forced myself not to stare at the people whose conversations i strained to overhear.

Suddenly, i was flooded with the horrors of prison and every disgusting experience that somehow i had been able to minimize while inside. I had developed the ability to be patient, calculating, and completely self-controlled. For the most part, i had been incapable of crying. I felt rigid, as though chunks of steel and concrete had worked themselves into my body. I was cold. I strained to touch my softness. I was afraid that prison had made me ugly.

My comrades helped a lot. They were so beautiful, natural, and healthy. I loved them for their kindness to me. It had been years since i had communicated with anyone intensely, and i talked to them almost compulsively. They were like medicine, helping me to ease back into myself again.

But i had changed, and in so many ways. I was no longer the wide-eyed, romantic young revolutionary who believed the revolution was just around the corner. I still appreciated energetic idealism, but i had long ago become convinced that revolution was a science. Generalities were no longer enough for me. Like my comrades, I believed that a higher level of political sophistication was necessary and that unity in the Black community had to become a priority. We could never afford to forget the lessons we had learned from COINTELPRO. As far as i was concerned, building a sense of national consciousness was one of the most important tasks that lay
ahead of us. I couldn’t see how we could seriously struggle without having a strong sense of collectivity, without being responsible for each other and to each other.

It was also clear to me that without a truly internationalist component nationalism was reactionary. There was nothing revolutionary about nationalism by itself – Hitler and Mussolini were nationalists. Any community seriously concerned with its own freedom has to be concerned about other peoples’ freedom as well. The victory of oppressed people anywhere in the world is a victory for Black people. Each time one of imperialism’s tentacles is cut off we are closer to liberation. The struggle in South Africa is the most important battle of the century for Black people. The defeat of apartheid in South Africa will bring Africans all over the planet closer to liberation. Imperialism is an international system of exploitation, and, we, as revolutionaries, need to be internationalists to defeat it.

Book details

Timbuktu mausoleums finally restored to former glory

null

 

The Meanings of TimbuktuA consecration ceremony was celebrated recently at the Timbuktu mausoleums, as the final phase of the United Nations-backed “cultural rebirth” of the ancient city after the destruction wrought by radical Islamists in 2012.

The ceremony was last held in Timbuktu in the 11th century. Mali was an economic, intellectual and spiritual capital and a centre for the diffusion of Islamic culture throughout Africa during its golden age in the 15th and 16th centuries.

“These mausoleums are now once again standing,” UNESCO director general Irina Bokova said. “This is irrefutable proof that unity is possible and peace is even stronger than before. We did it and we can do it again.”

Read: The Manuscripts of Ancient Timbuktu, Saved from Extremist Fire, are Again in Danger of Destruction

The mausoleums have long been places of pilgrimage for the people of Mali and neighbouring West African countries, and are widely believed to protect the city from danger. Sixteen of them are inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List and 14 were destroyed in 2012, representing a tragic loss for local communities.

The government of Mali in 2013 turned to outside partners, including UNESCO, for assistance. The preservation of ancient manuscripts and rehabilitation of the 14 destroyed mausoleums began in March 2014, when local masons under the supervision of Imam of Djingareyber, and with support from UNESCO and the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA), laid the first earthen brick to reconstruct two of the mausoleums.

It concluded in July 2015.

 

* * * * *

The Meanings of Timbuktu by Shamil Jeppie and Souleymane Bachir Diagne, strives to contextualise and clarify the importance of efforts to preserve Timbuktu’s manuscripts.

More about the book

The Meanings of Timbuktu sketches the significance of the city, an intellectual and spiritual capital for several centuries, within the context of the intellectual history of West Africa, in particular, and of the African continent, in general. The book covers four broad areas: Part I provides an introduction to the region; outlines what archaeology can tell us of its history; examines the paper and various calligraphic styles used in the manuscripts; and explains how ancient institutions of scholarship functioned. Part II begins to analyse what the manuscripts can tell us of African history. Part III offers insight into the lives and works of just a few of the many scholars who achieved renown in the region and beyond. Part IV provides a glimpse into Timbuktu’s libraries and private collections; and Part V looks at the written legacy of the eastern half of Africa, which like that of the western region, is often ignored.

Book details

Image courtesy of UN News Centre

Zuma’s State of the Nation Address attracted ‘positive sentiment’, according to social media research

State of the Nation: South Africa 2012–2013State of the Nation: South Africa 1994-2014State of the Nation 2016

 
The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) started the increase in “social media negativity”.

National Assembly speaker Baleka Mbete made things worse.

President Jacob Zuma came to the rescue and lifted the tone of the online chatter.

That’s according to analysis done by Media Tenor South Africa on last Thursday’s State of the Nation Address‚ which focused on the “conversations that occurred on Twitter”.

Media Tenor says the negativity set in when the EFF “began disrupt the event”‚ then added that the “tonality dropped even lower as … Mbete was criticised by social media users for the manner in which she was interpreting and applying the rules of Parliament”.

Once the EFF had left the house‚ Media Tenor said‚ “and the president continued with his speech‚ his coverage became largely objective”.

“He was able to attract some positive sentiment on the government’s plans to attract investment and address speding levels in the country.”

Zuma’s reply to parties on Thursday – following two chaotic days of debate on his address – “is likely to be a key factor which will shape social media conversations on the president”.


Source: TMG Digital

Related news:

Book details

  • State of the Nation 2016: Who is in Charge? Mandates, Accountability and Contestations in South Africa edited by Daniel Plaatjies, Charles Hongoro, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Muxe Nkondo, Francis Nyamnjoh
    EAN: 9780796925138
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!
  • State of the Nation: South Africa 1994-2014: A twenty-year review of freedom and democracy by Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Muxe Nkondo, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Moses Sithole, Francis Nyamnjoh
    Book homepage
    EAN: 9780796924612
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!
  • State of the Nation: South Africa 2012–2013: Addressing Inequality and Poverty edited by Jonathan D Jansen, Francis Nyamnjoh, Udesh Pillay, Gerard Hagg
    EAN: 9780796924223
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

Two-day State of the Nation debate begins today, Eastern Cape on the agenda

State of the Nation: South Africa 2012–2013State of the Nation: South Africa 1994-2014State of the Nation 2016Members of Parliament from both the National Assembly and the National Council of Provinces will this week participate in a two-day debate on President Jacob Zuma’s 2016 State of the Nation Address delivered last week.

The debate will be held in the National Assembly Chamber on Tuesday and Wednesday‚ followed by the President’s reply on Thursday.

Event Details

  • Date: Tuesday, 16 February and Wednesday, 17 February 2016
  • Venue: National Assembly Chamber

“The needs of the Eastern Cape and Nelson Mandela Bay” will feature early on in today’s debate, according to the Democratic Alliance’s mayoral candidate for the metro‚ Athol Trollip.

Trollip said he will raise these – and the African National Congress’ “ongoing neglect of this beautiful part of South Africa” – when he takes the podium in the National Assembly.

Trollip on Tuesday morning announced that he has got a good slot and “will be the second speaker for the DA‚ after federal leader‚ Mmusi Maimane”.

“In last Thursday’s State of the Nation Address‚ President (Jacob) Zuma provided no hope to the 8.3-million jobless South Africans‚ and neglected to account for his government’s failure to create jobs and grow the economy.”

“In all of Trollip’s interactions with thousands of residents of the Eastern Cape‚ and particularly Nelson Mandela Bay‚ the call is clear: Jobs are desperately needed‚ crime must be combatted and services must be delivered‚” a statement said.

“Yet President Zuma said nothing that will give our people any hope of jobs‚ safety and services.”

Source: TMG Digital

Related news:

Book details

  • State of the Nation 2016: Who is in Charge? Mandates, Accountability and Contestations in South Africa edited by Daniel Plaatjies, Charles Hongoro, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Muxe Nkondo, Francis Nyamnjoh
    EAN: 9780796925138
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!
  • State of the Nation: South Africa 1994-2014: A twenty-year review of freedom and democracy by Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Muxe Nkondo, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Moses Sithole, Francis Nyamnjoh
    Book homepage
    EAN: 9780796924612
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!
  • State of the Nation: South Africa 2012–2013: Addressing Inequality and Poverty edited by Jonathan D Jansen, Francis Nyamnjoh, Udesh Pillay, Gerard Hagg
    EAN: 9780796924223
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

Presidency tweets last year’s ’9 point plan’ ahead of the State of the Nation Address

State of the NationState of the Nation: South Africa 2012–2013State of the Nation: South Africa 1994-2014State of the Nation 2016

 

Critics who said they will give Thursday night’s State of the Nation Address (SONA) a miss because they’ve “heard it all before” would probably use the Presidency’s Twitter account as proof that they were right.

Shortly before noon‚ the official Twitter account of the Presidency, @PresidencyZA, let them hear it all again – in all of South Africa’s 11 official languages.

It tweeted details of the speech and attached a flyer containing the bullet points of “Government’s 9 point plan to grow the economy & create jobs” in each of the tongues‚ rounded off with the “#SONA2016” hashtag.

President Jacob Zuma announced the “nine-point plan to boost economic growth and create much-needed jobs” during the 2015 edition of his State of the National Address.

The nine points are:

1. Resolving the energy challenge
2. Revitalising agriculture and the agro-processing value chain
3. Advancing beneficiation or adding value to the mineral wealth
4. More effective implementation of a higher impact Industrial Action Policy Action Plan (IPAP)
5. Encouraging private-sector investment
6. Moderating workplace conflict
7. Unlocking the potential of SMMEs‚ cooperatives‚ townships and rural enterprises
8. State reform and boosting the role of state-owned companies‚ information and communications technology infrastructure or broadband roll-out‚ water‚ sanitation and transport infrastructure
9. Operation Phakisa‚ which is aimed at growing the ocean economy and other sectors

While political commentators have said this would be Zuma’s hardest Sona yet‚ the Presidency on Wednesday tweeted a photo with the caption: “President Zuma has high tea with some of his special guests who are invited to the SoNA taking place 2moro #SONA2016”.

Source: TMG Digital

 
Related stories:

Book details

  • State of the Nation: South Africa 2012–2013: Addressing Inequality and Poverty edited by Jonathan D Jansen, Francis Nyamnjoh, Udesh Pillay, Gerard Hagg
    EAN: 9780796924223
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!
  • State of the Nation: South Africa 1994-2014: A twenty-year review of freedom and democracy by Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Muxe Nkondo, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Moses Sithole, Francis Nyamnjoh
    Book homepage
    EAN: 9780796924612
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!
  • State of the Nation 2016: Who is in Charge? Mandates, Accountability and Contestations in South Africa edited by Daniel Plaatjies, Charles Hongoro, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Muxe Nkondo, Francis Nyamnjoh
    EAN: 9780796925138
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

‘Street trading is a reality that all African cities face’ – Claire Benit-Gbaffou of CUBES

Popular Politics in SA CitiesGreg Nicolson of the Daily Maverick interviewed Claire Benit-Gbaffou recently about the informal street trading charter.

The Charter For a Street-Trading Friendly African City was launched by the Save the Hawkers campaign at the Africities Summit at the end of November.

Benit-Gbaffou is a professor in the Wits’ Centre for Urbanism and Built Environment Studies (CUBES) and the author of Popular Politics in SA Cities: Unpacking Community Participation, published recently by HSRC Press.

In 2013, Johannesburg initiated Operation Clean Sweep, during which police evicted 7 000 street traders. It was this action that prompted Save the Hawkers to launch the informal street trading charter.

“Street trading is a reality that all African cities face, but very few take seriously,” Benit-Gbaffou says.

Read the interview:

Why was it necessary to draft such a charter?

The main objective of the charter is to demonstrate, through quite practical and simple steps (based on international ‘best practices’ as well as lessons from Johannesburg street traders practices and experiences in particular), that inclusive street trading management is actually possible. Many officials tend to dismiss any attempt to accommodate and integrate street trading in inner-cities on the basis that street trading management is ‘intractable’. That was the motivation behind Operation Clean Sweep – ‘it is unmanageable’, let us ‘clean sweep’ – but also behind policies conducted since the late 1990s: ‘let us clean the streets and put all traders into markets’, which we know from global experience cannot work for all traders. So, the charter is bringing together what we could learn from mistakes, from street traders’ own initiatives, from other municipalities’ initiatives, on what are concrete steps that would make street trading management possible, inclusive, sustainable.

Book details

Challenging State of the Nation for President Zuma

Commentary by Peter Attard Montalto‚ Emerging Markets Economist at Nomura

State of the Nation 2016State of the Nation: South Africa 1994-2014State of the Nation: South Africa 2012–2013The State of the Nation Address (SONA) by President Jacob Zuma on 11 February is actually more important in our view than the Budget on 24 February. We watch closely – as will rating agencies – to see the broader scope of policies on issues affecting growth and the investment environment.

After possible protests and disruption from opposition parties‚ we expect a broadly left-leaning speech in terms of policy specifics outside “National Treasury areas” but then a concerted and conservative segment on fiscal consolidation‚ possible hints at tax increases‚ parastatal management and investments.

We expect no major surprise policies or any major growth-boosting policies to reassure rating agencies – despite rhetoric about doing everything to secure the rating.

Markets still don’t fully grasp that rating agencies (and especially S&P) look set to downgrade South Africa in the medium run to sub-investment grade‚ not because of the budget per se but because of the lack of growth prospects and investment-friendly environment‚ which in turn throws up medium-run budget risks. For this reason we have always said that it is not fiscal policy that will be to blame for the sovereign reaching junk status but the government and the rest of policy – especially microeconomic policy.

After the political shock of three Finance Ministers in two weeks in December‚ opening Pandora’s box‚ a key question has arisen as to the political power of the new (old) Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan. For this reason we see President Zuma’s SONA next week as more important than the budget later this month.

The SONA can be thought of in three sections: first, non-economic policy that is less important to markets (defence‚ foreign policy‚ environmental issues)‚ second, National Treasury competency policy (fiscal‚ funding of various initiatives‚ parastatals to a degree‚ financial policy) and then wider economic or fiscal-impacting policy (industrial policy‚ labour policies‚ health care/NHI‚ education/fees‚ land reform‚ BEE issues).

The key question is how much influence can the political changes of December and Gordhan’s move back to the National Treasury have on this latter group of policy issues. We are highly sceptical on this point. We believe that Gordhan is having considerable influence on parastatals and issues like modalities of funding for education‚ but not on core issues like labour market reforms (an area he doesn’t believe needs altering anyway) or being able to prevent a high level national minimum wage. Put simply‚ we don’t believe he is having a great effect on growth-boosting policy areas and the political scope of National Treasury actions remains narrow.

However‚ we do believe that on (re-)taking the job he did extract some conditionality on fiscal and parastatals which will come out in the SONA – again hence its importance.

As such we expect the SONA (as indeed the whole of February) to suffer from a strong amount of cognitive dissonance. This should have two key parts‚ some left-leaning policy moves designed to help garner support into the local elections and to 2019 beyond; and then a core conservative “National Treasury” message on fiscal and parastatals as well as long-term investment and private funding of areas like education.

The SONA is also important because it should contain a number of strong hints about the budget to come‚ possibly including on the revenue side (though we don’t think it will be specific enough as to say yes or no on‚ say‚ VAT hikes).

We see cognitive dissonance because we see the SONA saying government is doing everything to boost growth and avoid entering sub-investment grade‚ but at the same time talking about accelerated land reform‚ minimum wage and more direct government involvement in the economy. We should remember we have already had an appetiser to this SONA with President Zuma’s 8 January ANC anniversary address and interviews.

Market expectations have been greatly inflated by the government since the start of the year and we think it will be difficult to meet them. Locals appear more willing to look for whatever positives they can‚ but foreign investors may well be more sceptical.

Our expectations of the SONA:

  • We expect both EFF and DA to launch protest action within the chamber against President Zuma just as he is called to give the SONA. This occurred at the SONA last year and resulted in first the EFF being escorted from the chamber by armed‚ plain-clothed security guards and then the DA leaving in protest. Protest action will likely revolve around opposition parties’ no-confidence in Zuma and the issue of Nkandla (even though the President is now open to some form of repayment). This may well delay proceedings though it seems new rules on how members of parliament can be ejected may reduce the length of any disruption. We doubt very much that the parliamentary authorities would again try to block mobile phone signals after the uproar and embarrassment that action caused last year.
  • When the speech does start it will likely have two central‚ conflicting‚ themes.
  • The first is what President Zuma has spoken about increasingly in recent months – correcting “300 years of inequality”. We expect rebalance and redress to feature strongly‚ while land reform‚ BEE changes and quotas will feature. Access to higher education and the minimum wage also falls within this area.
  • The second theme is the tough economic backdrop‚ averting sub-investment grade‚ fiscal conservatism and boosting growth. We think it will be particularly hard to find substance in this section of the speech‚ though it will most likely pre-commit to spending freezes in real terms‚ likely promising to prioritise investment spending over current spending (but we don’t think the budget will actually show that) and talk about stabilising debt levels. We expect only marginal focus on any of South Africa’s economic issues being largely home-grown‚ instead concentrating on a weak global backdrop and volatile capital flows with the Fed hiking rates. As such‚ we see an “admission of guilt” (personal or for government) as highly unlikely‚ and expect no mention at all of the events of December. However‚ it will be interesting to see how the President responds to these issues if they are put specifically to him in questions next week in parliament. We watch for any subtle attacks on markets or rating agencies for what happened in December (as the President did in recent TV interviews).

 
We watch for any specific promises on:

  • National Minimum Wage (NMW) timelines for legislation.
  • Progress and timelines regarding legalisation on mining‚ expropriations and new land reform processes‚ as well as any further reforms proposed to BEE and quota systems to advance historic redress.
  • Higher education funding should take up a serious chunk of the speech and we expect some further “giveaways” on fees‚ possibly extending the freeze for more years though we think government is unlikely to propose any zero-fee policy at this time. Reform of the student finance body to create a PPP (public private partnership) with private money to fund it and run it may be announced and would be welcome.
  • We think privatisations will not be mentioned but reform of parastatal management to bring in private sector talent could well be. However‚ we are sceptical on this point given the politicisation of boards.
  • Very long-term infrastructure spending on water may be a focus.
  • The President may well shift into “sales mode” on NHI given VAT hikes to come possibly in the budget‚ which is only really politically acceptable against NHI.

 
Overall‚ it is difficult for markets to interpret the SONA given its complex and wide-reaching content‚ contrasting themes and timing‚ after market hours. Watch through a ratings and growth lens – that is how the ratings agencies will be analysing it.

Source: TMG Digital/TMG Parliamentary Bureau
 

* * * * *

 

The 2016 State of the Nation speech at parliament is expected to begin at approximately 7pm on Thursday February 11 and will be televised.

Book details

  • State of the Nation 2016: Who is in Charge? Mandates, Accountability and Contestations in South Africa edited by Daniel Plaatjies, Charles Hongoro, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Muxe Nkondo, Francis Nyamnjoh
    EAN: 9780796925138
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!
  • State of the Nation: South Africa 1994-2014: A twenty-year review of freedom and democracy by Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Muxe Nkondo, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Moses Sithole, Francis Nyamnjoh
    Book homepage
    EAN: 9780796924612
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!
  • State of the Nation: South Africa 2012–2013: Addressing Inequality and Poverty edited by Jonathan D Jansen, Francis Nyamnjoh, Udesh Pillay, Gerard Hagg
    EAN: 9780796924223
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

Disability and Social Change: Brownies and Downies meets Cape Town’s special needs

 
In Cape Town, new coffee shops and restaurants open (or close) every week, so it’s easy to brush off the announcement of another one as insignificant. However, you might want to take notice of the latest addition to Long Street’s coffee scene.

Brownies&downieS – opening at 2 Long Street on Monday, 8 February – is a coffee shop and training centre for people with intellectual disabilities, and a vessel to create change and acceptance in South Africa.

Cape Argus‘s Iman Latief spoke to the people behind this incredible and much needed concept, which was started in the Netherlands, to find out more.

Read the article and see photos:

The founders, Teun Horck, a chef, and Thijs Swinkels, who worked at a special-needs school, set up the first restaurant in 2010 in Vegjel, Holland.

They wanted to employ more people with disabilities in the hospitality sector. They have since opened about 30 stores in the Netherlands.
Dutch social worker Wendy Vermeulen said when she moved to South Africa she could see that there was even less awareness or support for the mentally disabled community than in her home country.

“In the Netherlands it’s more common to employ disabled people than it is here. The mentally disabled in particular have very little voice in South Africa,” she said.

Vermeulen, the daughter of a chef, decided to open a Cape Town branch of the Brownies and Downies restaurant. She has been preparing to open it for almost a year.

 

* * * * * * *

 

For more about disability issues in South Africa consult Disability and Social Change – A South African Agenda, published by HSRC Press:

Disability and Social Change - A South African Agenda Disability and Social Change – A South African Agenda edited by Brian Watermeyer, Leslie Swartz, Theresa Lorenzo, Margie Schneider, Mark Priestley
Book homepage
EAN: 9780796921376
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

This powerful volume represents the broadest engagement with disability issues in South Africa yet. Themes include theoretical approaches to and representations of disability, governmental and civil society responses to disability, aspects of education as these pertain to the oppression / liberation of disabled people, social security for disabled people, the complex politics permeating service provision relationships, and consideration of disability in relation to human spaces – physical, economic and philosophical.

Noteworthy is the inclusivity of its nearly fifty contributors, many of whom write both as disabled South Africans and as educators, parents, linguists, psychologists, human rights activists, entrepreneurs, mental health practitioners, academics, and NGO and government officials. Equally stimulating is the range of writing styles, including interviews, a provocatively stark contrasting of voices in a chapter on Psychiatric Disability and Social Change, various well crafted articles on theoretical issues and the autobiographical style of many of the contributions.

Firmly located within the social model of disability, this collection will resonate powerfully with contemporary thinking and research in the disability field and will set the benchmark for cutting-edge debates in a transforming South Africa.